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Matters of Substance

Matters of Substance February 2013

Cover story

Future drugs

All around the world, things are rapidly changing. There are signs the War on Drugs may be running out of steam, new technologies promise new treatment possibilities, and scientific developments may be altering the very nature of drugs themselves. Here in New Zealand, bold new policy initiatives mean the treatment landscape will soon look vastly different. Rob Zorn talks with a few experts about what we can expect to see over the next few years.

Features

The Drug War in retreat
Are we witnessing the beginning of the end for the global War on Drugs? Attacks on drug war ideology are coming from all quarters, argues Russell Brown, to the point where the United Nations has been forced to act. But how much regard the UN will give to the widening calls for reform remains to be seen – and not all the signs are good.

Crime and punishment: the sorry state of Russian drug policy
Russia’s treatment of its addicted citizens is characterised by cruelty, writes Max Daly. They are denied life-saving medicine. They are beaten, fitted up by the cops, raped and tortured. They are, according to Russian state-sponsored propaganda, subhuman scum whose schizophrenic minds need correcting with anti-psychotic drugs. Yet according to the country’s narcotics official, these are the luckiest drug addicts on the planet.

Putting the ‘bi’ into binge
Emma Hart suggests there’s a reason why bisexual people binge drink more than straight dudes and dudesses and that the biphobic media aren’t helping the situation at all.

How we see things from our front gate
In 2011, Russell School became the centre for one small neighbourhood’s battle. Its success in reducing harm from a poorly managed local liquor store shows what can be achieved when communities engage and mobilise.

 

Crime and punishment: the sorry state of Russian drug policy
Russia’s treatment of its addicted citizens is characterised by cruelty, writes Max Daly. They are denied life-saving medicine. They are beaten, fitted up by the cops, raped and tortured. They are, according to Russian state-sponsored propaganda, subhuman scum whose schizophrenic minds need correcting with anti-psychotic drugs. Yet according to the country’s narcotics official, these are the luckiest drug addicts on the planet.

Regulars

Directors cut

Executive Director Ross Bell ponders about the emphasis put on cannabis in arguments about drugs.

Guest editorial — Why the UN needs civil society

Yury Fedotov, the Executive Director of the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime writes about the important role of civil society.

Opinion — Where now for opponents of cannabis law reform?

Steve Rolles considers how recent cannabis law reform victories are reshaping the landscape of the oldest debate in drug policy.

Centrefold — The cost of our convictions

How much does imprisoning young New Zealanders for minor drug offences cost us?

Viewpoints — Should unregistered naltrexone implants be used to treat opioid dependence?

Naltrexone is still untested. Should we allow it to be used as an opiod blocker? Viewpoints takes a look,

Mythbusters — There is no such thing as cannabis withdrawal

Cannabis doesn't have the physical symptoms of withdrawl that other drugs have, but it does have it.

Q&A — Russell Brand

On the tenth anniversary of his recovery, comedian Russell Brand invited Matters of Substance backstage to the final show of his Australia and New Zealand tour. We talked about recovery, pears, and his pro-recovery activism. Happy 10 years in recovery, Russell.

About a drug — Cocaine

She don't lie, she don't lie, she don't lie.