Back to top

[ Skip to main content ]
Tom Hemopo stuff

The government must urgently act to end the persistent failure by the criminal justice system to address disproportionate Māori reoffending rates, said the New Zealand Drug Foundation in response to a Waitangi Tribunal report, Tū mai te rangi.

The Drug Foundation has backed the claim by former Corrections officer Tom Hemopo, and welcomes the Tribunal’s findings that the Crown has breached its Treaty of Waitangi obligations by failing to address the high rates of Māori reoffending and reimprisonment.

The Tribunal’s report condemned the “grossly disproportionate, decades-long, and increasing Māori overrepresentation in the nation’s prisons”, which it said was a “devastating situation for Māori, and for the nation”.

“Our criminal justice system has been failing Māori for decades and we’re not seeing any sign of improvement despite reports over decades highlighting these failures,” said Ross Bell, Drug Foundation Executive Director.

“We endorse the Tribunal’s recommendations to improve efforts by the Department of Corrections to tackle high rates of imprisonment and reoffending, but the Government should urgently find ways to turn off the tap of people entering prison in the first place.

“Our obsolete drug law, which is 42-years-old, is a key reason for people being imprisoned, with about 40 percent of Māori jailed on drug-related charges. Treating drugs as a health issue by reforming our drug law and investing heavily in drug treatment and rehabilitation would be a great place for the government to start to reduce the burden of our criminal justice system on Māori whanau and communities,” said Mr Bell.

“We should all be ashamed that New Zealand has its highest prison population ever, with Māori making up an increasing proportion of that. The government invests too much into punishing people while failing to eliminate drug treatment waiting lists. About 80 percent of the government’s spending on tackling drugs goes to Police, courts and prisons. We have the balance wrong. It’s time now to re-focus government’s efforts on drug prevention, education, treatment and rehabilitation.”

The Drug Foundation supports the 2011 Law Commission recommendation that the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975 be repealed and replaced by a mandatory cautioning and health referral scheme.

“We would urge political parties to go into this election year with clear policies around drug law reform.  The criminal justice approach to drug harm is not working, and serves only to drive up our prison population, which, as this report highlights, impacts greatly on Māori,” said Mr Bell.

Share this article:
Share:

Check out these related articles: See more articles on Conviction

MPs told immediate health focused drug law change is essential

Drug Foundation submission supports amendments to the Misuse of Drugs Act - with some misgivings...

Read More

New drug law reform coalition calls for better outcomes for Māori

Māori health organisations Te Rau Ora and Hāpai Te Hauora have joined the New Zealand Drug Foundation and others to set up the Health not Ha......

Read More

New report highlights drug policy trends

A new State of the Nation report we released in January 2019 shows that while we are doing well in some areas, there is massive room for imp......

Read More
MoS march 2019 thumbnail tipene

The truth we all need to hear

Korero Pono JustSpeak exhibition: Even the shortest prison sentence can be a life sentence for some....

Read More
e substance newsletter promotional thumbnail

Subscribe to email updates

Get regular news, analysis and commentary on drugs issues in New Zealand. Free.

Sign up now!

Did You Know resources thumbnail

Did You Know: Teenagers can handle facts about drugs

Young people are more likely to delay or not use alcohol or other drugs if they know the facts about specific substances. Use our age-appropriate tools to start conversations with whānau and your young person... a-sap!

Learn more