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Policy and Advocacy

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Matters of Substance article

Guest editorial - Hello Friday Afternoon?

Finding ways to address problem drinking one day after another takes a lot of creativity and ingenuity. Hello Sunday Morning founder Chris Raine brings these qualities in spades. He shares his thoughts on what day is next.

Matters of Substance article

Opinion - To reduce drug-related harm, it’s time to be honest about the pleasure

Acknowledging the reasons most people actually use alcohol and other drugs could help them use them more safely, argues Global Drug Survey founder Adam Winstock. This article first appeared on theconversation.com

Matters of Substance article

Viewpoints - The Brownfield Doctrine

With global drug policy coming under the spotlight in the lead up the UNGASS 2016, we take a look one part of a playing field on the move.  

Introduction

Russell Brown looks more closely at these and the implications they may have. Together, three the drug control conventions provide the legal structure for a global system of drug control by defining control measures to be maintained and prescribing rules to be obeyed by the parties in their relations with each other.

Matters of Substance article

Q & A - A UK Liberal Democrat talks drug policy

Just after his resignation as Minister of State for the Home Office responsible for the drugs portfolio in November 2014, British MP Norman Baker talked to David Young about drug policy in the UK and the widespread mood for reform.

One reason cited for the British MP and Liberal Democrat Party member Norman Baker’s resignation was a row over drugs policy with Home Secretary Theresa May. Baker is quoted as saying there was little support for “rational, evidence-based policy” in the Home Office.

Matters of Substance article

About a drug - LSD

Lysergic acid diethylamide (or LSD) has many street names including yellow sunshine, window pane and Microdot but it is most commonly known as acid.

It is mainly used recreationally, as an entheogen (a fancy word for a chemical that brings you closer to the divine) and – in the 60s and 70s and again more recently – in psychedelic therapy for alcohol dependence and anxiety.

Matters of Substance article

Mythbusters - All heavy drinkers are alcoholics

That guy who is notorious for getting legless at every social gathering might be called an alkie or an alcoholic behind his back. But the label is unlikely to be on the mark, at least not from a diagnostic point of view. New research from the United States has found that nine out of 10 heavy and binge drinkers are not dependent on alcohol and could potentially curb their drinking with a combination of effort and support.

Matters of Substance article

Underdosing Naloxone - part 4

Globally, an estimated 69,000 people die each year from opioid overdose. The drug naloxone can quickly block opioid receptors in the brain and is used in some cases to bring people back from the brink of overdose death. Amberleigh Jack looks at why naloxone is not being used more widely.

Matters of Substance article

Voting for change was the easy part

As state regulation of cannabis moves forward in several US states, it’s too early to say how the legalisative experiments will turn out. Professor Mark AR Kleiman, who visited New Zealand as a guest of the Drug Foundation last November, brings a blindingly clear angle to the public policy conundrums that arise. Cameron Price delves into what happens after the votes are counted.

Matters of Substance article

Underdosing naloxone

Globally, an estimated 69,000 people die each year from opioid overdose. The drug naloxone can quickly block opioid receptors in the brain and is used in some cases to bring people back from the brink of overdose death. Amberleigh Jack looks at why naloxone is not being used more widely.

Matters of Substance article

Good booze news from across the ditch

In late November 2014, the Australian Government’s Institute of Health and Welfare released its full report on the 2013 Australian National Drug Strategy Household Survey. The survey has been conducted every two or three years since 1985, and 2013’s iteration collected information from almost 24,000 people, asking them about their use, attitudes and opinions on alcohol, tobacco, illicit drugs and what they think about alcohol and drug policies. As Rob Zorn reports, the results are pretty encouraging.